Is there a right time end a therapy?

Is there a right time end a therapy?

Is there a right time end a therapy?

Throughout my journey with Guy , I’ve always been involved with therapists of one discipline or another. The vast majority of them have been amazing , demonstrating their dedication to the cause at every turn , acting as my anchor in the storm and enabling me to retain my sanity when frustration was about to envelop me.

 

Many of them have empowered me and truly changed my life, teaching me about practices and approaches I would never have previously dreamed of.

 

There is a misconception many parents fall into believing that just because someone is trained  as a therapist , their offer and the way they work will suit you or your child all the time. 

That’s not to say that they are bad or poor therapists: rather that their approach doesn’t sit comfortably with you. There are many different paths or methodologies a therapist can follow in order to achieve a desired outcome, and it may just be that the way they work doesn’t gel with the way you do . 

 

Consequently, choosing someone who is suitable for your purposes can be a hit or miss , particularly when you’re starting out and have no real knowledge or understanding of what it is you’re looking for and a clear plan on how you should get there.

 

Ending a therapy is an emotional process and we often don’t always feel ready to do so especially as we have been in a certain therapy for years and find it hard to end similar to any relationship that doesn’t benefit us anymore.

 

I fell into this exact same paradigm: I had a FloorTime therapist for 6 years, the first three years were beneficial, I have seen many changes and progress throughout this period so I continued on.

The following  three years weren’t that good, the same methods and materials were repeated and the benefit to my son was minimal – and yet I found it hard to end .

I was dependent on that therapist and was blinded thinking that I would be lost if we stopped the sessions.

 

Once I stopped the sessions I was emotionally free to assess and rethink the right path to progress, I was proud of myself for having the strength to stop the session while keeping in good relationship with the therapist.

There are few red flags parents should consider while their child is undergoing any type of therapy or treatment.

 

– If the therapist avoids your questions or if you are not happy with the answers you are getting when discussing the goals or program to achieve targets 

 – Bad communication with the therapist-  you know you’ll never be able to communicate with him or her openly.

– Therapist disrespects your child or being impatient when the child is misbehaving or not being cooperative. – after all it’s the therapist job to help you deal with the emotions that are the basis of this behavior, your child might not be able to verbalize the way he or she feels towards the therapy and or the therapist and the expectation is that the therapist will be able to deal with it in a creative way.

 

– The Therapist wants to keep the child in therapy services for indefinite time periods with ill -defined goals –every therapy or treatment are due to achieve progress and they should end once the targets are met.

 

–  There is no actual program or progress summary the therapists repeats the same content of sessions frequently without making changes or adding challenges to the program – remember, if the therapist doesn’t challenge the child in a positive way there will not be a progress.

 

-You reach a plateau- if you feel that the sessions are not beneficial stop it for a couple of weeks or a month to let you assess the situation and check for yourself the benefit of the treatment.

 

It’s recommended to have a diary to record the progress made.  A diary is an excellent tool to monitor the progress on a weekly basis for you to feel on top of the therapy goals and targets, assess where you are now and where do you see the therapy going towards.

 

Treat the therapy as a project you manage to get results in a defined period of time. You should ask yourself the following questions:

What are the next actions?

Am I going in the right way to get the results I want to get?

Is my child cooperating well with the therapist?

Is there a shorter way to achieve my goals?

Do I see the progress I anticipated to see before the treatment started? If not why not?

What are the ‘road blocks’ in the therapy?  

what can I do today to remove the obstacles and get a crystal clear view regarding the therapy or treatment’s goals and progress made?

 

It is natural to lose control over the therapy goals especially when the therapy extends over years and there a mutual trust with the therapist, the therapist should be honest enough to stop the sessions when it’s time to do so however in many cases it’s not being done and the treatment can prolong for years without much progress. I hope that after reading this article you will have the tools to cut the cord when its time to do so.

 

Always remember one door closes and another opens it’s true for so many situations in life and especially when it comes to therapy treatments and relationships.

 

5 daily challenges to improve articulation

5 daily challenges to improve articulation

5  fun activities that improve speech and articulation :

  1.  Blowing bubbles through straws  in different capacity containers.
  2.  Sucking  sugar-free lollipops.
  3. Blowing  different kinds of whistles . @talktool have a  wonderful assortment ( see photo).
  4. Bite down on baby chewing toys . ( like vibrating tethers ).
  5. Make tongue movements :  Putting peanut butter on his lips so he had to use his tongue to lick it off  or  looking in the mirror while moving his tongue , and putting a sugar free M&M sized sweet in his mouth and  getting him to move it from side to side with his tongue.

Doing these activities on a daily basis is the key to success.

lollipop autism results
lollipop autism results
5 tips on how to improve hand-eye coordination and improve your reading and writing .

5 tips on how to improve hand-eye coordination and improve your reading and writing .

When our son started school at the age of 5 and could not form any letters , I had bought a variety of  programs which intended to help him to trace and track the letters  but it didn’t help .

I have listed  how we overcame this disability and learnt to write . Now his hand writing is clear and legible .

1.  Primitive reflexes :  We all have active neurological reflexes present in our central nervous system , those enable us to function as we do in a day to day life . We  are born ,with a number of primitive reflexes, and those facilitate our development in the womb and make it possible for us to undergo the natural birthing process as well as stimulating  our natural development during our early life .  They are tested at birth , and when present , indicate   that the neurological development in the womb is as it should be .  After that, they hang around until we reach certain developmental milestones , such as smiling for the first time or taking the first step, and are able to to perform normal infantile movements in the correct manner . Once we reach that stage , they have no further play in our life and our brains inhibits or removes them from our central nervous system .   As the primitive reflexes are inhibited or removed , they are replaced  by postural neurological reflexes, which remain active in our central nervous system for the rest of our lives, ensuring that we can undertake normal daily movement patterns.  BUT when these primitive reflexes stay from some reason or other in our central nervous system they are a BARRIER TO NORMAL DEVELOPMENT. some of the symptoms include : *Difficulty with visual tracking and crossing the midline.

  • Difficulty with reading and following a line of text.  easily losing their place when reading.
  • Difficulty reading small print.
  • Double vision.
  • poor listening skills.
  • poor handwriting and difficulty coping written script.
  • difficulty with spelling.
  • poor hand eye coordination.
  • impulsive and emotionally immature for their age.

For more information on the primitive reflexes please refer the chapter under the same name in my book.    

 

 

 

 

 

2.   Activities for crossing the midline :

3. Throwing and catching balls , hitting balls  and jumping.    The jumping movement is good for the child’s brain because , like all movement , it provides a lot of stimulus to the vestibular system , which then sends impulses to the cerebrum, thereby helping to develop the neural pathways and rewire the brain . Research shows that brain functions such as reading, comprehension , memory and the ability to evaluate and do mathematics are deeply affected by activities that stress balance, efficiency and spatial awareness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. play dough:

5. Therapeutic listening : In short , it’s an approach that recognizes that listening goes well beyond the ears and is a function of the brain . The way we listen affects the way we behave, and so to that end , therapeutic listening uses sound training together with sensory integrative techniques that don’t just stimulate the auditory system but also help rewire those parts of the brain that enable us to hear .  What’s more, it can help people who exhibit a myriad of behavior types .

5 tips to help with Sensory Processing difficulties

5 tips to help with Sensory Processing difficulties

 

 

 When it comes to sensory challenges there are few ideas that help parents to understand their child better and engage in a fun activity that let the child express their feeling and feel in control of the situation.

Here are some ideas from my latest chat with Lindsey Biel,   

  1. Tactile – de-sensitization : play dough and give the child a cookie cutter , any tool and slowly introduce the touch feeling, Or when using finger paint use a glove , brush and work towards sense of control.
  2. Auditory : use sound reducing ear-muffs which should be available for the difficult noisy experiences.                          In addition implement therapeutic listening -an approach that recognizes that listening goes well beyond the ears and is a function of the brain .
  3. Smell – throw out the house hold garbage on a daily basis.
  4. Vestibular system : Make sure to create opportunities to move at times that are appropriate , like jumping on the trampoline 20 minutes prior to dinner ,so that at dinner time the child won’t have the need to jump around.
  5. proprioceptive input : Have your child help you take out the washing from the washing machine or push the grocery cart at the shop.

Listen to my chat with Lindsey Biel to learn more 

5 tips to learn to tell the Time

5 tips to learn to tell the Time

Telling the time is an important skill in our our everyday life BUT sometimes it’s tricky to learn .

  1. Start by introducing time concepts of morning , afternoon and evening . Learning which activities relate to certain parts of the day for example the meals we have through the day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.   Counting until 60 and knowing to count by 5   5,10,15,20  ……..60. (Skip counting) . This helps children to understand better addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

3.  Learning that the long minute hand represents the minutes and the short Hours hand represents the hours.

4. Practicing telling the time on a White Board- this can be done taking turns to make it more playful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  Using our body to represent the time .  

In this example I have used a Long sock to represent the minutes and a short sock to represent the hour .

Combing the body-mind connection by working on the proprioceptive sense.  

Through working on our senses we grasp the concept of telling the time much better and also have a better understanding of our body as well as working on directionality and our spatial orientation which also contribute for better reading and better hand writing .

 

How to  get the hand writing going ?

How to  get the hand writing going ?

When my son was in year 3 in school he was unable to form letters or numbers .  His school provided him with a laptop as his spellings were good but they did not think he was able to write and the OT the school had provided said that the law only requires a child  to be  able to sign his name BUT I had big dreams for my son , i believed he will be able to write . Now as a teenager his hand writing is neat  and nice and he loves writing stories .

At first I had purchased different tracking activities but quickly realised that my son was unable to follow the templates as his focus , tracking and eye teaming were  very poor .  After working with a vision therapist here are my recommendations.

Here are my 5 tips :

  1. Working on the primitive reflexes is a game changer .  Primitive reflexes :  We all have active neurological reflexes present in our central nervous system , those enable us to function as we do in a day to day life . We  are born ,with a number of primitive reflexes, and those facilitate our development in the womb and make it possible for us to undergo the natural birthing process as well as stimulating  our natural development during our early life .  They are tested at birth , and when present , indicate   that the neurological development in the womb is as it should be .  After that, they hang around until we reach certain developmental milestones , such as smiling for the first time or taking the first step, and are able to to perform normal infantile movements in the correct manner . Once we reach that stage , they have no further play in our life and our brains inhibits or removes them from our central nervous system .   As the primitive reflexes are inhibited or removed , they are replaced  by postural neurological reflexes, which remain active in our central nervous system for the rest of our lives, ensuring that we can undertake normal daily movement patterns.  BUT when these primitive reflexes stay from some reason or other in our central nervous system they are a BARRIER TO NORMAL DEVELOPMENT. some of the symptoms include : *Difficulty with visual tracking and crossing the midline.
    • Difficulty with reading and following a line of text.  easily losing their place when reading.
    • Difficulty reading small print.
    • Double vision.
    • poor listening skills.
    • poor handwriting and difficulty coping written script.
    • difficulty with spelling.
    • poor hand eye coordination.
    • impulsive and emotionally immature for their age.

 

Activities for crossing the mid line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross motor activities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fine motor activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choosing the right pencil grip .   

 

 

 

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Primitive Reflexes...

 

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